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TRANSPARENCY SCORE
The transparency grade represents the expectation that the federal government should make data about U.S. global health assistance available, accessible, and informative. To see the transparency grade, toggle below.

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TRANSPARENCY SCORE
The transparency grade represents the expectation that the federal government should make data about U.S. global health assistance available, accessible, and informative. To see the transparency grade, toggle below.

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D+

This is an average of the three domain scores below.

YEAR 2018

White House

The White House received a 69 (D+) with transparency and a 73 (C) without transparency . This is due to the fact that the grades for both Family Planning and Maternal and Child Health are low because insufficient funds were requested for both programs in the FY 2019 budget request. The White House’s grade increased in the HIV and AIDS domain because the President signed the reauthorization of PEPFAR and requested sufficient funds for HIV and AIDS in the FY 2019 budget request. Budgetary information for the White House was difficult to find, which led to a low transparency score across the board.

Selecting a document will download the file
2018_President’s-Budget-Request.pdf

B+
A-

HIV & AIDS

 

The White House received a 87 (B+) with transparency and an 92 (A-) without transparency for HIV and AIDS because it signed into law two HIV and AIDS-related pieces of legislation in 2018. Neither policy hinders the ability of U.S. global health assistance to support comprehensive HIV and AIDS programs globally that are based in evidence and human rights principles. However, both policies had the potential to include gender transformative language, but did not. The White House budget within this domain received a high score because the budget request included adequate funding for PEPFAR and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Similar to other domains, the transparency score for the White House under HIV and AIDS is low due to difficulty accessing budgetary information and the inability to search White House policies by criteria that have been previously available.

The CHANGE data index grades government agencies on policies and funding impacting family planning, maternal and child health, and HIV & AIDS foreign assistance.

Selecting a document will download the file
2018_Asia Reassurance Initiative Act of 2018 (S. 2736)
The Asia Reassurance Initiative Act discusses U.S. efforts to improve relations with countries in Asia and promote democracy and human rights within the region. These efforts are responsive to need and based in human rights principles, particularly related to reducing poverty and violations of human rights that have occurred within the region. However, the law is not gender transformative or strongly evidence-based in HIV and AIDS prevention and treatment efforts. It mentions "reducing the HIV and AIDS infection rate” through the Lower Mekong Initiative (LMI), but provides no programmatic guidance on how to accomplish this. The LMI was launched in 2009 and is a multinational partnership among Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and the U.S. to create integrated sub-regional cooperation among the five Lower Mekong countries. The LMI could serve as a promising platform for HIV and AIDS prevention and treatment efforts, but, this could only be implemented if additional policy and technical guidance are released. The law also briefly mentions supporting women’s equality, but does not discuss the importance of addressing GBV and SRHR in promoting democracy and human rights. Given the prevalence of GBV against ethnic and religious minorities in the region, this is a missed opportunity by the White House to address this issue. For these reasons, this law will likely only have minimal direct effect on the ability of U.S. global health assistance to support HIV and AIDS programs in the region.
2018_PEPFAR Extension Act of 2018 (H.R. 6651)
The PEPFAR Extension Act amends the PEPFAR Stewardship and Oversight Act of 2013 by extending the authorization of PEPFAR through FY 2023. The law allows PEPFAR to continue its programming, which is largely evidence-based, responsive to need, and based in human rights norms. However, this law also maintains previous authorization language that is not gender transformative and continues clauses that cause harm to key populations, such as the Anti-Prostitution Loyalty Oath and the "conscience clause". With the reauthorization, the White House had the opportunity to revise these harmful aspects of the authorization of PEPFAR and chose not to do so. As a result, this law moderately promotes the ability of U.S. global health assistance to promote HIV and AIDS programs that are evidence-informed, responsive to need, consistent with human rights principles, and gender transformative.
D
D+

Maternal and Child Health (MCH)

 

The White House received a 63 (D) with transparency and 68 (D+) without transparency for Maternal and Child Health because the President’s FY 2019 budget did not allocate funds for UNICEF or for UNIFEM (now UN Women). The White House also did not issue any maternal health executive actions or sign any MCH-related legislation in 2018. Similar to other domains, the transparency score for the White House under MCH is low due to difficulty accessing funding information and the inability to search White House policies by criteria that have been previously available. The low transparency score in this domain, in combination with the lack of funds requested for UNICEF and UNIFEM in the President’s FY 2019 budget request, led to this low score.

F
F

Family Planning (FP)

 

The White House received a 54 (F) with transparency and 59 (F) without transparency in Family Planning. In the FY 2019 budget request, the White House did not request any funding for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and zeroed out all family planning funds for USAID. These budgetary determinations significantly hindered the ability of U.S. global health assistance to support comprehensive family planning programs. The White House did not issue any executive orders or presidential memoranda related to family planning nor did it sign any family planning policies into law in 2018. The transparency score for the White House is low for family planning due to the difficulty accessing budgetary and policy information.